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From Brown to Blooms: Meadow Installation in Our Southern Parks

Don’t freak out on us!  We know many folks are wondering why the beautiful meadows in Broad Run and Turkey Run Parks are brown. Well, it’s because we killed them. But don’t worry, we have a plan.

We first conducted a thorough kill to these areas as the invasive plants had reached the point where treating them individually would not be practical nor successful. As part of our Urban Conservation Initiative work, this kill is setting the stage for a rebirth that is certain to surprise people next summer.

Over 8 varieties of warm season grasses and 24 flowering native perennials are being installed in these meadows as we speak. Some of the species being planted, include:

 

Canada Wild Rye

Broomsedge

Swamp Milkweed

Butterfly Weed

 

Blackeyed Susan

 

N.E. Aster

 

Ohio Spiderwort

 

You will most noticeably appreciate these meadows next spring and summer when they first bloom. Benefits to wildlife will be tremendous as we expect the patterns we’ve seen in the northern park meadows to repeat themselves in the south. From butterflies and finches, to bobwhite quail and small mammals, these meadows are home to a wide variety of wildlife that need specialized warm season grass areas for their survival. Unfortunately, most of these meadows have been carved up since settlement, which makes it all the more critical for The Parklands to continue its work to establish and maintain these biodiversity hotspots.

This meadow installation is made possible thanks to The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust

In addition to the work in Seaton Valley and the Grand Allee, our Natural Areas team uses herbicides throughout The Parklands to help manage invasive species. Each member of our Natural Areas team is a licensed applicator and is trained to take necessary precautions to reduce drift. Using the herbicides minimally and in targeted areas helps us improve habitat throughout The Parklands, while also keeping visitors and wildlife safe.

 

About the Author

Picture of Scott  Martin

Scott Martin

Scott served as the Parks Director for The Parklands of Floyds Fork from 2010 to 2017. Tasked with operating the park, Scott served as member of the leadership team that sought to reapply the metropolitan planning and development lessons of Fredrick Law Olmsted in the new century with the wrinkle of the new model being a private/public partnership. Scott joined The Parklands team in 2010 after serving eight years as the Director of Commerce & Leisure Services in Franklin County, VA. In this capacity, he was part of the County’s leadership team overseeing economic development, parks & recreation, tourism, and pilot open space conservation programs. Prior to Franklin County, Scott spent five years working for the Boise (Idaho) Parks and Recreation Department as the Coordinator of Partnerships during which time he provided staff support and conservation planning for the successful $10 million Foothills Open Space Serial Levy campaign that has preserved over 9,000 acres of land to date. Scott holds a MPA (Natural Resource and Environmental Policy with honors) and BA (Political Science) from Boise State University. Scott and his wife spend their free time kayaking, camping, and hiking.

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$2,030,650 To Date
80%
$2,550,000 2018 Goal

Being a donor-supported public park means we rely on donations, not tax dollars, for annual operations each year. Because of your generosity, we are able to maintain, program, and further develop this extraordinary public space without charging an entry fee. Together we work to enhance quality of life and help our community and economy grow in ways that are healthy, sustainable, and enjoyable for people of all ages. Help us reach our goal of sustaining The Parklands by becoming a Member today. Members make it happen!

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