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Flooding and then Record Snow in The Parklands - oh my!

Wow!!  Who knew that Lonnie Dupre was this serious when he said his goal was to bring a feeling of the Arctic to Louisville last week? 

We’ve measured snow across the park, at least the sections we can access, and our official accumulation total is 10 inches. 10 inches of snow for March in this part of the world is certainly a historical weather event.  Additionally, if you missed it, Floyds Fork flooded yesterday in a pretty big way. The Fork rose to over 10 feet on the river gauge at Fisherville (in Pope Lick Park). This level of flooding occurs on average about 3-4 times per year.  What was different this time is that the temperature dropped WHILE the Fork was out of its banks in spots.  For the first time in the history of The Parklands, there is significant ice underneath this fresh blanket of snow along lower sections of the park roads and Louisville Loop. This “flood” ice is going to take a while to melt as it is very thick and locked to the ground where it froze in place.

So, use caution in the park.  Even surfaces that are cleared of snow may still have some significant ice on them. This is especially true for sections of the Louisville Loop and park roads that were under water yesterday.  Places like the North Beckley Paddling Access, I-64 underpass, Sara and W.L. Lyons Brown Bridge underpass, and the Loop south of John Floyd Fields will take some serious help from our crews and Mother Nature to dry out and melt over the weekend. 

For the next couple of weeks, your best bet for fun (and dry trails) in the park will be at our higher elevation sites – areas like Trestle Point, Garden Gateway, and the Great Wall.  Be safe out there and enjoy this last blast (we hope) of winter.  Believe it or not, we are truly just a couple weeks away from spring wildflowers, the beginning of spring migration patterns, and more comfortable outdoor weather.

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$1,767,358 To Date
64%
$2,780,000 2019 Goal

Being a donor-supported public park means we rely on donations, not tax dollars, for annual operations each year. Because of your generosity, we are able to maintain, program, and further develop this extraordinary public space without charging an entry fee. Together we work to enhance quality of life and help our community and economy grow in ways that are healthy, sustainable, and enjoyable for people of all ages. Help us reach our goal of sustaining The Parklands by becoming a Member today. Members make it happen!

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