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I Spy: The Insects of Summer

You don’t have to look very far to find colorful and identifiable insects here at The Parklands. In a few brief moments an onlooker can spot the vivid and captivating color of the Blue Dasher dragonfly, feel the fuzzy coat of a woolly worm, or spot the unexpected flight of a grasshopper. While you can find a multitude of insects here at The Parklands, I wanted to select three insects that are easily found but also provide a visually stimulating experience.

A good opportunity to see Blue Dasher dragonflies can be found near the surrounding areas of the PNC Achievement Center. If visitors keep their eyes peeled near the open areas around the facility as well as the grasses near the Sycamore trail, then Blue Dashers might be spotted! Another excellent place to search for these eye candies is the bank of the Floyds Fork. Often times, you can find males laying claim to their territory by the waterside. They will display their dominance by showing their blue abdomen to potential threats.

Our next insect of discussion is the woolly worm! I’m sure we’ve all heard the folklore of how these fuzzy friends can indicate the severity of the winter months to come. It is said that if the woolly worm has a thin brown stripe, then winter will be harsh. On the other hand, if the insect has a thick brown stripe, then winter might show us a bit of mercy. Either way, the woolly worm is a fun critter than can be enjoyed by all ages! Be sure to keep an eye out for woolly worms as they should be more frequent in the weeks to come. Scan sidewalks and edges of trails to spot these creatures.

Our last insect is most noticeable by the distinctive sound it makes. A grasshopper rubs its legs against its forewings to produce the repetitious clicking sound. Grasshoppers will often spend time perched on blades of grass or other plant structure and for the most part can be spotted fairly easily. If you’re not able to see any grasshoppers, just listen for the sound and begin the search! Once you have found the location of the insect, quickly try to spot it so that you can see the rapid movement of the legs that are producing the sound.

These are just a few of the insects you can befriend here at The Parklands. As the summer months are beginning to dwindle in days and lessen in heat, make sure to swing by and be on the lookout for our small, yet fascinating insects!

About the Author

Picture of Jared Norvell

Jared Norvell

Jared joined The Parklands crew in the summer of 2014. His background includes a Masters degree in Recreation and Park Administration from Eastern Kentucky University. This skill set allows Jared to convey interpretive messages and educational concepts at the PNC Achievement Center for Education and Interpretation where he works as an Interpretive Ranger. If he can’t be found on the grounds of The Parklands, you might find him deer hunting or fishing with his wife, Jerrica.

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